CAPSULE: ACROSS THE UNIVERSE (2007)

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DIRECTED BY: Julie Taymor

FEATURING: Jim Sturgess, Evan Rachel Wood

PLOT: More than thirty Beatles songs illustrate a romance between a working-class

Still from Across the Universe (2007)

Liverpudlian and a New England WASP during the tumultuous 1960s.

WHY IT WON’T MAKE THE LIST:  Set in a sentimentalized Sixties, it’s inevitable that Across the Universe heaves to that decades psychedelic squalls.  Spectacular director Julie Taymor relishes slathering lysergic pigment on her CGI canvas for five or six of the thirty plus songs, but the ultimately the story is more about how all you need is love than it is about girls with kaleidoscope eyes.

COMMENTS:  In a career of a mere eight years, the Beatles probably cranked out more memorable melodies than Mozart.  It was a minor stroke of genius to adapt that songbook into a musical.  The script of Across the Universe, which tells the story of a pair of young lovers and their friends with the Vietnam War protests and the Summer of Love as a backdrop, can be viewed in two ways.  It could be seen a complete failure, built out of equal parts of romantic cliché and self-congratulatory Baby Boomer nostalgia.  Or, it could be looked at as a masterpiece of craftsmanship, considering the fact that the scriptwriters had to weave a coherent epic tale from a relatively small catalog of three-minute song-stories containing no recurring characters.  Like most musicals, however, the story is almost beside the point; it only needs to be good enough to set up the next production number.  Fortunately for weirdophiles, the numbers Universe‘s story sets up are frequently cosmic, though you will have to wade through an hour of character setup before it starts coming on.  This being an archetypal 1960’s tale, there’s a nod to acid culture: more than a nod, it’s a magical mystery tour through an extended three song medley.  It starts with the principals sipping LSD-spiked drinks at a party while a Ken Kesey type (played by Bono) lectures on mind expansion using “I Am the Walrus” as the holy text; whirling cameras and and tie-dye colored solarization gives their trip to the countryside via magic bus the requisite grooviness.  This sequence segues into “For the Benefit of Mr. Kite,” where another acid-guru (Eddie Izzard) takes the crew inside his magic tent for a twisted computer-generated carnival complete with a roller skating pony, a dancing team of Blue Meanies, and contortionists in spooky wooden tribal masks.  The scene’s an impressive visual spectacle whose impact fizzles thanks to Izzard massacring the lyrics through an off-the-beat, spoken-word delivery with some unfortunate improvisations.  The dreamy comedown features the flower children staring up at the sky, imagining themselves tastefully nude and making love underwater.  Psychedelia intrudes into other numbers, as well: the carefully layered images of “Strawberry Fields Forever” feature bleeding strawberries that morph into fruit bombs splattering on the jungles of Vietnam; “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” includes a cameo by Salma Hayek as five sexy dancing nurses, and a bliss-giving syringe filled with a nude dancing girl.  The best and weirdest segment may be “I Want You/She’s So Heavy,” which addresses the draft board and stars a talking poster of Uncle Sam, dancing sergeants with square plastic chins, and a platoon of soldiers lugging the Statue of Liberty.  Standout non-weird numbers include a gospel version of “Let It Be” set during the Detroit riots and a funky “Come Together” performed by Joe Cocker, who sings as three different characters, including a natty pimp backed by a chorus of hookers.  Hardcore Beatles fans will rate Universe a must see (and they’ve probably already seen it); unless you’re some sicko who absolutely can’t stand Lennon-McCartney compositions, you’ll want to check it out just for the visuals.  It can get pretty far out.

Despite its weird parts, Across the Universe was able to secure a mainstream release.  Audiences were willing to accept the unreal scenes because they were presented in the lone format where the average person expects and accepts surrealism—the music video. Unfortunately, however, even the Beatles fan base couldn’t make Taymor’s experiment profitable at the box office.

WHAT THE CRITICS SAY:

“A cameo by Bono as a sort of godfather among hippies (delivering a forceful cover of ‘I Am the Walrus’) shifts the movie into a hallucinatory realm, with a tie-dye color scheme that suggests scenes were shot during an acid trip with Baz Luhrmann. Viewers who like movies to reflect their out-of-body experiences will gladly inhale, but for others, the excess may seem off-putting.”–Justin Chang, Variety (contemporaneous)

2 thoughts on “CAPSULE: ACROSS THE UNIVERSE (2007)”

  1. I watched this yesterday, and I came in with some heavy skepticism. I was dead wrong. This has to be my new favorite musical. I really was blown away by the Art direction, the great Beatles covers, and I was amazed on how they constructed a pretty good romance story from 30 different Beatles songs. I kept smiling at all the 60’s references throughout the movie, especially the Ken Kesey one, since I read the Electric Acid Kool-Aid Tests not too long ago. All and all, I really don’t understand how Beatles fans can hate this movie. I see it as a great artistic tribute to not only them, but the Flower Power decade in general. Then again, there will always be the naysayers.

  2. Hello. I am a naysayer. I was barely able to sit through this twee High School Musicalised best-of-the-Beatles catalogue. Oh yeah, there’s some cute visuals (the military induction scene is kind of clever, if not obvious). A couple of cringe-inducing moments: Fake Janis Joplin and boyfriend Fake Jimi Hendrix have an onstage argument… IN SONG, Prudence is gay and she’s in the closet… literally and her friends are determined to sing her out of the closet, the most uncoolest person in the world – Bono – murders I Am The Walrus. Have you heard the Jim Carrey version? It’s actually better. My judgement has not been tarnished by the facts that I think that: 1. The Beatles were overrated twerps with a handful of good songs and 2. All musicals are terrible

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