Category Archives: Miscellanea

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/18/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Greener Grass (2019): An absurdist suburban satire expanded from an award-winning short. We’ve been waiting on a theatrical release for this one since we noted it at Sundance; reviews are universally positive so far (so we know Rex Reed hasn’t seen it). In select theaters on the coasts, and more widely available on-demand; we should review this one soon. Greener Grass official site.

IN DEVELOPMENT (pre-production):

“Consumed”: Jordan Ruimy reports that is planning to emerge from semi-retirement to pen and direct a mini-series for Netflix based on his 2014 novel “Consumed.” Cronenberg’s late film work hasn’t been his weirdest, but the novel synopsis sounds promising, with cannibalism. rare STDs, and a global conspiracy all playing a part. Read the report at World of Reel.

IN DEVELOPMENT (post-production):

Lection (est. 2020): A small-town post-apocalyptic political thriller set in a world where elections are decided by gladiatorial combat. Made for $25,000, they are seeking an extra $5,000 (at this writing more like $3,500) for post-production costs. How can we resist plugging a project that ends its pitch with “Help us show you our weird little movie”? Lection at Indiegogo.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Genius Party (2007)/Genius Party Beyond (2008): The original is an anime anthology of seven short films, some weirder than others, with the most notable participant; the shorter sequel adds five more films. Shout! Factory fit both collections on a single Blu-ray disc. Buy Genius Party/Genius Party Beyond.

Häxan (1922) : Read the Certified Weird entry! The Criterion Collection celebrates Halloween with a Blu-ray upgrade of the  silent witchcraft narrative/documentary blend; the -narrated Witchcraft Through the Ages cut is included, of course. Buy Häxan.

Killer Nun (1979): A convent sister (played by nun-other than Anita Ekberg) descends into degeneracy and murder. This giallo-nunsploitation madness, which also features cult fave , has been sitting in our reader-suggested review queue for some time.  Arrow Video releases a Special Edition Blu-ray with the usual metric ton of special features. Buy Killer Nun.

The Lingering (2018): This weird Hong Kong horror film is in two parts: in the first a mother and son wait for the father to return home on New Year’s Eve, while the second concerns a man caring for parents with dementia. In one of the only available English-language reviews Jeffery Kaufman says that the second part is “very odd, and the final few minutes are actually admittedly quite touching in their own weird way, but the rest of this film is frankly a mess.” On DVD, Blu-ray or DVD. Buy The Lingering.

Sensual Psychedelia (2019): The copy explains that the movie is about three women on their way to a rave who encounter a UFO that leads to psychedelic sex orgies. The box cover suggests that the director (who also produced a short called “The Breast Around: Electric Boobaloo”) is interested in filming a very specific type of woman (think , then add a couple of cup sizes). Don’t say we didn’t warn you. On DVD, Blu-ray, or VOD. Buy Sensual Psychedelia.

“Twin Peaks: The Television Collection”: A collection of all of the televised episodes of ,” from the ABC series to Showtime’s “The Return.” None of the special features seem to be unique to this set. If you didn’t buy the TV seasons separately, and already owned (or for some reason didn’t want) Fire Walk with Me from “The Entire Mystery” set, or if you wanted the entire television run on DVD rather than Blu-ray (you have the option of either format here), then perhaps this release makes sense. It’s good to have a lot of different “Peaks” purchase options, at least. Buy “Twin Peaks: The Television Collection”.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We’ll only list irregularly scheduled one-time screenings of this audience-participation classic below. You can use this page to find a regular weekly screening near you.

YOU LINK US! YOU REALLY LINK US!: The University of Stirling’s student newspaper suggests five “odd” movies to its readers (including three canonically weird ones) and lists us as a source of further “snack-bites.” Read their article, “Five odd movies for those ‘too-average’ days,” to find out what weirdness Scottish university students are getting into these days.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Due to personal late-week commitments, this column is being composed well ahead of the deadline (instead of at the last possible minute, as it usually is). Therefore, we’re not entirely sure what we’ll be publishing next week, but we can tell you that Giles Edwards gets into the Halloween spirit with a review of ‘s zombie opus, The Dead Don’t Die. There will be more, probably, but that’s the only thing we can confirm at this early date. For more info, check in next week! Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/11/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

FILM FESTIVALS – Brooklyn Horror Film Festival (Brooklyn, NY, Oct. 17-24):

Situated firmly in the Halloween corridor, Brooklyn Horror is an up and coming film festival going into its 4th year of operation. This year’s slate includes a number of films we either caught or at least noted previously, including 1BR, Daniel Isn’t Real, Koko-di Koko-da, the 58-minute expanded psychedelic music video Blood Machines, and the Polish hospitality fantasy Monument. The Fest will also have a seasonal screening of Halloween fave The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) on October 18th (we’ll remind you again next week.) Here are a couple of new features and featurettes we haven’t seen mentioned elsewhere:

  • Apocalypse After – 38-minutes of experimental hallucinatory imagery from , screening together with the aforementioned Blood Machines on Oct. 20.
  • The Yellow Night – A “trippy… hypnotic millennial nightmare” with Brazilian teens caught in some kind of space-time continuum disturbance thing. North American premier on Oct 20.

Brooklyn Horror Film Festival home page.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Every Time I Die (2019): The soul of a troubled paramedic migrates into the bodies of his friends after he dies. At least one critic liked this low-budget psychological thriller with “a surreal feel” quite a lot. Blu-ray, DVD or VOD. Buy Every Time I Die.

Idiots and Angels (2008): Read the Certified Weird review! seems to have signed an exclusive deal with Apple TV, and all of his catalog, including this Canonically Weird cartoon about a despicable man who grows angel wings, will presumably be streamable and downloadable there for the foreseeable future. (All of his other features look to be there, as well). Idiots and Angels on Apple TV (Itunes).

The Killer of Dolls (1975): A sexually repressed killer puts on a mask and stalks women in this giallo-esque Spanish Eurotrash feature that the ad copy describes as “bizarre and totally unique…” Mondo Macabro releases this lost horror on Blu-ray and features a quote on the cover from a letterboxd review (that’s a first). Buy The Killer of Dolls.

Midosmmar (2019): Read our review. ‘s Swedish folk horror/nightmare breakup story divided critics and viewers, and our readers were no exception; if you missed it in theaters, now’s your chance to catch it and weigh in. The “Director’s Cut” version is not an option here (which suggests that Midsommar will be re-released again later). On DVD, Blu-ray, or VOD. Buy Midsommar.

NEW ON NETFLIX:

The Forest of Love (2019): movie about a conman who insinuates his way into a wealthy widow’s life, and the film crew that comes to believe he’s actually a serial killer. James Hadfield of The Japan Times describes it as “peak Sono: a garish, gore-drenched S&M exploitation epic that plays like a compilation of his greatest hits without ever really breaking new ground.” Debuting exclusively on Netflix on 10/11. Not sure if the dubbing will be optional or mandatory for American viewing. The Forest of Love on Netflix.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We’ll only list irregularly scheduled one-time screenings of this audience-participation classic below. You can use this page to find a regular weekly screening near you.

NEPOTISM CORNER:

“Brother Cobweb”: Alfred Eaker‘s long-gestating semi-autobiographical novel about a boy growing up in a repressive puritanical household—and his imaginary enemy, the sinister Brother Cobweb—is finally complete. It’s set to be published in Spring 2020 (Easter season) but signed advance copies are being sold through House of Shadows, the Portland haunted house where Alfred performs the title character.  The copy describes it as “a coming of age saga with a misfit, paradoxical artist at its center… a surreal and provocative odyssey sure to strike a nerve as it exposes the abuses and hypocrisy of an all-too-familiar Midwestern evangelical church.” Illustrations by the talented Todd M. Coe. Buy an advance copy of “Brother Cobweb.”

Brother Cobweb cover

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Next week, Rafael Moreira has prepped a review of the crazy-cute Portuguese soccer satire Diamantino, will report on ‘s abandoned public-access parody webseries “Divorced Dad,” and we’ll probably throw in at least one more review for you. Behind the scenes, we’re already working on our 2019 Yearbook, with plans (not promises) to get it out by December this year, and steadily working on the 366 Weird Movies book-length compendium, as well. Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/4/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN DEVELOPMENT (completed):

Sister Tempest (2020): strikes again with another crowdfunded surrealist epic. This one is a psychological thriller-type tale taking place in a dreamspace equally inspired by and Zardoz. We can 100% guarantee this will be weird; the trailer will convince you, too. Sister Tempest official Facebook page.

“Twin Peaks, Season 4”: It’s happening again… maybe. Probably. Seemingly sparked by a Sep. 27 tweet from the Hollywood Horror Museum. More obscure hints followed from cast members, and, perhaps more importantly, no one has stepped in to squash the rumors. We first heard rumblings from We Got This Covered, but Indiewire has the deepest coverage (although we’re not ready to sign on to Zach Scharf’s conclusion that “The Return“‘s ending was perfect and left the series nowhere to go).

DVR ALERT:

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) continues their Halloween slate; this week, we’re highlighting their 10/10 showing of the Expressionistic / creepfest The Black Cat (1934). More Canonically Weird movies will play later in October. Here’s the full month’s schedule courtesy of comicbook.com.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Birds Without Feathers (2018): Experimental feature mixing stories of six odd people—an Instagram celebrity, a performance artist, a Russian fan, and so on—in a technologically alienated world. On blu-ray (no DVD) or VOD. Buy Birds Without Feathers.

“The House of Hitchcock”: Collectible set of fifteen classics on Blu-ray, featuring Vertigo (1958), The Birds (1963), and more. All this material has been previously released (including the 15 hours of supplements), but this limited edition comes in snazzy new spooky-house-themed packaging with lots of inserts (postcard-sized posters of each flick, blueprints for the Bates motel, and more). Buy “The House of Hitchcock Collection”.

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006): Read the Canonically Weird entry! This release of ‘s Spanish Civil War-set fairy tale appears to be a simple 4K upgrade of the existing material.  On Ultra 4K disc with a standard Blu-ray bonus disc (and a digital copy). Buy Pan’s Labyrinth.

Star Leaf (2015): A veteran searches for a grove of extraterrestrial marijuana (!) to cure his PSTD, but finds himself in trouble when he refuses to follow the directions for safe use. Released on DVD way back in 2015, it’s now re-relased on a “Special Edition” Blu-ray, DVD and VOD (or free on Amazon Prime). IMDB also lists a TV Seires (web series?) called “Star Leaf: Rise of the Archon” in 2019, but with no information beyond the title. Buy Star Leaf.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We’ll only list special one-time screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a regular weekly screening near you.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Next week we’re back into that neglected reader-suggested review queue for our long-awaited take on the quintessentially Japanese madness of Electric Dragon 80000V (2001). We’ll complement that one with a pair of reviews of lower-budgeted fare, as Simon Hyslop goes backwards to review the first film of the Bloodsucker‘s duology, Bloodsucker’s Handbook (2012), and Giles Edwards braves the surreal pretentiousness of Odissea Della Morte (2019), which despite the title is made by Canadians and set in Canada (with vacation footage from Italy). Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 9/27/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

The Death of Dick Long (2019): Bandmates try to cover up the demise of the title character in this offering from Swiss Army Mans . Fresh off Fantastic Fest, A24 gives it a quick theatrical release; if you can’t find it, it’s scheduled for video-on-demand a couple of weeks from now. The Death of Dick Long official site.

Sister Aimee (2019): The plot is (very) loosely based on a true story about a female faith healer from the 1920s who fled the spotlight and hid out in Mexico, with musical numbers. A long shot for this site’s readers, but Indiewire’s Kate Erbland does say it’s “occasionally weird.” Sister Aimee official Facebook page.

IN DEVELOPMENT (completed):

1000 Kings (2019): Logline: “In an artificial world of colors and shapes a beehive society strives for light.” It will have its festival debut at Montreal’s Festival de Nouveau Cinema in October. Definitely weird. 1000 Kings official Facebook page.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Diamantino (2018): A Portuguese soccer star adopts an African lesbian immigrant, while his twin sisters are conducting secret genetic experiments. We have been waiting on this one for quite a while; it finally arrives on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD. Buy Diamantino.

In the Aftermath (1988): Here’s a real oddity: in 1988 ‘s New World Pictures bought the rights to ‘s surreal anime Angel’s Egg and wrote a new (live action!) story about an angel helping a couple of soldiers after the apocalypse. Arrow Video releases a deluxe Blu-ray of Aftermath with bells and whistles (including a documentary featurette about Oshii’s original)—and yet a decent and affordable version of Egg itself remains mysteriously absent from home video. Buy Angel’s Egg.

Jacob’s Ladder (2019): An Afghanistan war veteran returns home to find the brother he thought he’d lost in combat is still alive, and has been the subject of army-sponsored psychotropic drug experiments. A remake (of sorts) of the Canonically Weird 1990 psychological thriller. On DVD and VOD (no Blu-ray) after a super-brief run in theaters. Buy Jacob’s Ladder (2019).

Luz (2018): Read Giles Edward’s review. This low-budget supernatural hypnotism police procedural beat the odds to find distribution; after a brief theatrical run it’s out on DVD and VOD (a Blu-ray was announced but we didn’t find it on offer—one may show up later). Buy Luz.

Sleepy Hollow (1999): The story of Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman, as told in the whimsical Gothic style of . Not generally acknowledged as a weird movie, but it has at least one champion here. This is a “20th Anniversary” Blu-ray, but the only advertised special feature is an illustrated booklet with the original Washington Irving story (which is kind of cool). Buy Sleepy Hollow.

BOOKS:

“The End of the World”: A reprint of a sort-of graphic novel created (the press release tells us) from “abandoned ideas that were too strange to make it to the big screen.” The panels were originally dashed-off on post-it notes, and retain that aesthetic for 244 pages. Available via Kindle of hardcover (for weird coffee tables). Buy “The End of the World”.

DVR ALERT:

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) always broadcasts a fine creepy slate of Halloween offerings. This year, they’re screening some deep cut Canonically Weird films along with the usual classic suspects. On September 28 you can catch Belladonna of Sadness (1973) (!) at 2AM EST, followed by House [Hausu] (1977). We’ll try to keep you updated as October rolls along, but here’s the full month+ schedule courtesy of comicbook.com.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FREE (LEGITIMATE RELEASE) MOVIES ON YOUTUBE:

“MetropolisRemix: Metropolis (1927) Colorized & Dubbed” You read that right: ‘s seminal silent sci-fi classic Metropolis (1927), colorized and dubbed. We hardly think Metropolis needed to be colorized and/or dubbed, but it’s impossible not to admire the painstaking technical work involved.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Next week, G. Smalley gets back to that long-neglected reader-suggested review queue with a look at the Hong Kong psychic procedural Mad Detective (2007). And we’ll take a look at a pair of low-budget 2019 releases, as Simon Hyslop takes a trip to Bloodsucker’s Planet, while Giles Edwards considers whether The VelociPastor is the Second Coming of deliberate camp, or needs to say five Hail Marys. Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 9/20/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Malibu Road (2016?): In 1960 a psychology professor and a starlet take LSD in a hotel room; the aftereffects haunt them up until the present day. This originally came out—or maybe it was announced and then canceled—in 2016; at any rate, it’s now listed as “premiering” in Los Angeles this week. Malibu Road official site.

Zeroville (2015): An idiot-savant with a tattoo of Montgomery Clift and Elizabeth Taylor on the back of his head goes to Hollywood and makes movies. This James Franco project was finished in 2015, but the distributor went bankrupt, and then sexual misconduct allegations about the director/star started bubbling up; only now has a new distributor been brave enough to take it on. The trailer describes a film-within-the-film as “a very weird movie”; here’s hoping the container film is, too. Zeroville official site.

FILM FESTIVALS – Fantastic Fest (Austin, TX, Sep. 19-26):

The Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, TX may be America’s coolest movie theater. Their brand has grown so big that now they have franchised Drafthouses, and have lately partnered with American Genre Films Archives on a number of interesting exploitation film re-releases. One of the Alamo’s hippest projects is Fantastic Fest, now in its fourteenth year. As per usual, there is a fantastic slate of weird movies and some neato revivals here. Coming at the tail end of the film festival season, we’ve already either noted or reviewed a number of these. Among the duplicates are the Slamdance microbudget feature The Vast of Night, along with a number of films we caught at the : Bliss, Come to Daddy, The Deeper You Dig, Knives and Skin, Ride Your Wave, Swallow, Vivarium, Why Don’t You Just Die?, and Koko-Di Koko-Da (about which we hope to have more for you soon…) Coming fresh off the Toronto International Film festival are The Antenna, ‘s The Color out of Space, ‘s Deerskin, ‘s First Love, and and ‘s Synchronic, along with the zombified Super-8 tribute Die Kinder Der Toten (noted at the Karlov Vary Festival). And with all of that, they still managed to score a coup with the American debut of Jojo Rabbit, along with the following weirdo debuts and revivals (including one you’ll find listed below under “Repertory Screenings):

  • Abou Leila – Hallucinatory quest set in the desert during Algeria’s 1994 civil war. Screening Sep. 20 & 23.
  • Blood Machines – A crowdfunded feature-length expansion of the viral sci-fi-ish music video “Turbo Killer.” Catch it Sep. 23.
  • Butt Boy – Absurd comedy about a straight suburban white guy who becomes obsessed with sticking things where the sun don’t shine. See it if you dare on Sep. 21 or 26.
  • Cosmic Candy – A woman addicted to the title hallucinogenic treat takes care of the child of a missing neighbor. Screens Sep. 21 and 25.
  • The Death of Dick Long – Bandmates try to cover up the demise of the title character in this offering from Swiss Army Man‘s that programmers called “the kind of film that makes you glad weird cinema is alive and well.” Screens on the 20th and 23rd.
  • I Lost My Body – Animated French film about a disembodied hand; this has been one of our most-anticipated releases of the year. Netflix already bought the rights. See it Sep. 20 or 23.
  • In the Tall Grass – adaptation of a Stephen King novella about kids lost in the Tall Grass (spooky!) Sep. 20 or 23.
  • Keep Me Company – Secret lesbian lovers hear voices from the pool as they try to salvage their adulterous relationship. Sep. 22nd and 25th.
  • Limbo (1999) – Rarely seen experimental video nightmare, the only feature directed by direct-to-video scream queen Tina Krause. Screens Sep.. 25th only.
  • Night Has Come – Experimental Belgian film composed entirely of stock footage and overlaid with narration about a memory-erasing virus. Don’t forget to see it on Sep. 23rd.
  • The Peanut Butter Solution (1985) – Severin Films’ restoration of the terrifyingly bizarro children’s lark is terrific news—hopefully someday soon, everyone will be able to see the legendary film that scarred a generation of Canadians. You won’t regret catching it on Sep. 24.
  • Prey (1977) – Vintage exploitation oddity about a shapeshifting alien who infiltrates a lesbian household. Sep. 20 & 23.
  • Son of the White Mare (1981) – Hungary’s celebrated psychedelic fairy tale continues its pre Blu-ray release tour. Be Mare or be square on Sep. 20 & 23.
  • Tammy and the T-Rex (1994) – The restored “gore” cut that’s been making the festival rounds. One more screening on 9/25.
  • VHYes – Sounds like an experimental “found footage” movie; young Ralph accidentally tapes himself goofing with his buddy, as well as several late night TV shows, over his parents’ wedding tape, and we watch the results. Sep. 21 & 23.
  • The Wave – A corporate lawyer takes a mysterious psychedelic that sends him on a time-traveling trip. Screens Sep. 21 & 24.
  • Wyrm – Young Wyrm must kiss a girl to remove his electric collar and pass his school’s sexuality requirement. Pop your collar on Sep. 21 or 25.

Fantastic Fest home page.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Above the Shadows (2019): Here’s a plot you don’t see every day: an invisible woman helps a disgraced MMA fighter get his career back. Critics suggested there’s a reason you don’t see this plot every day. DVD, VOD or Blu-ray. Buy Above the Shadows.

“Batman 4K Film Collection”: All four Batman movies in Warner Brothers 80s-90s series, from the reasonably entertaining first entry, its canonically weird followup Batman Returns, and the two embarrassing late sequels. 4K restorations on Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD disc (eight discs in all), bundled together, with the special features from individual releases intact. Buy the “Batman 4K Film Collection”.

Dry Blood (2017): A man travels to a cabin in the woods to go cold turkey and starts hallucinating in this “surreal mystery.” This came out on DVD and Blu-ray in January and now it’s out in both formats again; no idea why it was re-released. Also free on Amazon Prime. Buy Dry Blood.

“The I-Land” (2019): Ten attractive people wake up on an island with no memories, etc. It’s “Lost” as done by the inimitable/infamous , and we note it specifically because of a Paste review titled “Netflix’s The I-Land May Be the Worst TV Show I’ve Ever Seen” which makes the intriguing claim “imagine the movie Serenity, then have it make 200% less sense.” “The I-Land” on Netflix.

Nightwish (1989): Paranormal investigators hallucinate that they are fighting ghosts, aliens and demons, and no one is sure what’s real. A weird B-movie that’s been out of print for a while, now on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD courtesy of Unearthed Records. Buy Nightwish.

Odissea della Morte (2018): A man charged with his girlfriend’s murder sets out to prove his innocence from the back of a limousine, but his quest turns into a surreal and sleazy Odyssey of Death. Despite the Italian title, this was made in Canada, on a low budget. Free on Amazon Prime or buy the Blu-ray, which is emblazoned with hashtags: #erotic and #giallo. Buy Odissea della Morte.

Polyester (1981): Read Alfred Eaker’s overview of John Waters. goes (relatively) soft and suburban working with his biggest budgeted movie to date, a Douglas Sirk send-up starring as a suburban housewife surrounded by sleaze. The Criterion Collection does Waters proud on DVD or Blu-ray with a host of new an old features and (of course) an Odorama card. Buy Polyester.

The Velocipastor (2019): A priest transforms into a dinosaur and fights ninja. This has been enough of an underground hit to rush out a Blu-ray to supplement previous DVD and VOD offerings. We should get around to reviewing this before the end of the year. Buy The Velocipastor.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FREE (LEGITIMATE RELEASE) MOVIES ON TUBI.TV:

The God Inside My Ear (2017): Read Pete Trbovich’s review. Our house reviewer didn’t exactly sing the praises of this low-budget indie about a girl who starts hearing the voice of God after being dumped by her boyfriend, but now you can judge for yourself at no cost. Watch The God Inside My Ear on Tubi.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: What are we up to next week? Well, we should have a transcript of our recent interview with Koko-di Koko-da director ready, to whet your appetite for its upcoming limited theatrical release. Giles Edwards will also check out the microbudget camp of Space Ninjas (2019), while Pete Trbovich gives his opinion on the oft-requested Beetlejuice (1988). And we wouldn’t be at all surprised to have an additional unannounced review pop up: you’ll just have to check in daily to see. Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 9/13/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Chained for Life (2018): Read Giles Edwards’ review. At the time of this writing, this comedy about “freaks” making their own movie during off-hours on another movie set currently holds an impressive 100% positive rating at Rotten Tomatoes. Ridiculous trivia: Freaks (see below) and Chained for Life both share names with movies starring conjoined twins the Hilton Sisters. Chained for Life official site.

Freaks (2018): Read Giles Edwards’ review. As promised in our (possibly spoilery) interview, the festival hit about a 10-year-old girl whose father keeps her locked inside and warns her never to leave the house receives a Friday the 13th release. Freaks official site.

Monos (2019): Enigmatic Colombian film about a purposeless group of soldiers camped in a fog-shrouded jungle. It’s receiving excellent reviews (with optimistic comparisons to Apocalypse Now). Monos official site.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Bloodsucker’s Planet (2019): A spaceship crew responding to a planetary distress signal encounter talking alien cockroaches, a gynobot with romantic delusions, and space vampires. An ultra-low budget 60s retro space opera, and a prequel to a 2012 movie (Bloodsucker’s Handbook) we never heard of, but looks weird. Blu-ray, DVD or VOD. Buy Bloodsucker’s Planet.

The Dead Don’t Die (2019): Residents of a small town endure a plague of zombies caused when polar fracking knocks the earth off its axis in this self-aware zombie parody. Features clunky satire and inconsistently deployed self-referential humor, but it is fun to see the amazing cast (led by a weary ) get picked off by the undead. On Blu-ray, DVD and VOD. Buy The Dead Don’t Die.

“Undone” (2019): A new Amazon Prime series about a young woman whose dead father teaches her to time-travel. If that’s not enough oddity for you, we’ll add that it’s rotoscoped and from the makers of “Bojack Horseman.” The season debuts 9/13. “Undone” on Amazon Prime.

STREAMING SERVICES:

Spamflix: Questionable name, interesting service. Founded by a couple of international film festival programmers, spamflix specializes in rare films they describe as “absurd, fantastical and bizarre” and promises a platform “where genre enthusiasts can become ensorcelled with cinematic oddities from around the world.” The catalogue differs by country. The available-in-U.S. roster is currently small, but impressive, headlined (in our estimation) by the canonically weird Der Samurai (2014) (which is available on other platforms) and ‘s abstract Symbol (which is not). Other interesting, underseen films include Gandu, Liza the Fox Fairy, and the UFO musical The Legend of Kaspar Hauser. Spamflix.com.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FREE (LEGITIMATE RELEASE) MOVIES ON YOUTUBE:

K-12 (2019): Pop singer Melanie Martinez released a movie (a real musical, not just a “visual album”) in conjunction with her latest release, and put it up on YouTube for free. It’s a fantasy about a girl who is sent to a strict and surreal boarding school, and rebels; the aesthetic is almost oppressively pink. No word on how long it will remain up, so we assume indefinitely. Watch K-12 free on YouTube.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Last week was weird sex week; next week, we’ll go back to our regular format of just throwing whatever we feel like up on the page. Therefore, you can expect another eclectic slate of weird movie writing, starting off with G. Smalley‘s report on ‘s 15-hour classic, Berlin Alexanderplatz; Giles Edwards on Netflix’s Dark Crystal prequel  “The Age of Resistance”; and Pete Trbovich getting philosophical with his essay “Questions Are Beautiful.” Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 9/6/2019

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

FILM FESTIVALS – Toronto International Film Festival (Toronto, Canada, 9/5-15):

In the past few years, TIFF has risen from a scrappy underdog to an awards-season kingmaker. As their profile has risen, the number of smaller, scrappier, weirder films debuting here has fallen. Still, the slate is so massive (a reported 200+ movies!) that there’s bound to be something strange showing up there. The one interesting odd film we previously noted at other festivals is ‘s Deerskin; here’s some new stuff we’ll be tracking:

  • About Endlessness – Gloomy Swede is back with another series of melancholy absurdist vignettes, this time watched over by a couple floating in the air. Screening 9/11, 14-15.
  • The Antenna – A newly-installed antenna leads to “nightmare-scapes of early-Cronenbergian proportions” in this surreal-sounding horror from Turkey. View it 9/8, 10 or 15.
  • Bacurau – A Brazilian village is sold to big human game hunters; they fight back with psychotropic drugs in what programmers call “a wild, weird, and politically charged revisionist western.” Screens 9/7, 9, 13.
  • Color Out of Space directs in an adaptation of an story with psychedelic special effects; yes, we might be interested. You can check it out on 9/7, 9 or 14.
  • Crazy World – The third international release from Uganda’s IGG Nabwana (Bad Black), this one involves kid-kidnappers accidentally nabbing a bunch of pint-sized martial arts masters. 9/14 and 9/15 (closing the “Midnight Madness” section).
  • First Love – A boxer and a call girl get caught up with drug smugglers in this well-reviewed (and likely less-than-weird) comedy from that takes place over the course of one night. Screening 9/13-15.
  • The Lost Okoroshi – Nigerian film about a man haunted by dreams until he is transformed into a purple spirit. 9/6, 8 or 15.
  • Red Fields [Mami] – A “surrealist” rock opera from Israel. Screens 9/6, 8, 13.
  • Synchronic and return to their strange cinematic universe, this time as New Orleans paramedics investigating victims of a designer drug. 9/7, 9 or 13.
  • The Twentieth Century‘s debut feature is a “bizarro” biopic of former Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King including an “ejaculating cactus”; could be the weirdest feature playing TIFF. See in 9/10, 12 or 14.

Toronto International Film Festival home page.

IN DEVELOPMENT (Crowdfunding):

“Squash” (est. 2019-2020): If you enjoyed “The Absence of Eddie Table,” you may be interested in this proposed short film from Dave Cooper, the visual artist who wrote and designed that cartoon. There are no details on the plot, but Cooper describes his aesthetic as “ and thrust into a mud wrestling ring” and promises “Squash” will contain “custom-engineered nipple prosthetics.” What more do you need to know to throw a few bucks his way? Seeking just under $9,000 (in U.S. dollars), and at this writing had raised just over $2,500. “Squash” on Kickstarter.

IN DEVELOPMENT (Announced):

Uzumaki (2020): The Cartoon Network’s “” line has announced an animated adaptation of the story of spiraling madness outlinesd in the manga “Uzumaki” (which you may recognize from its 200 live-action movie version, Spiral). The four-episode miniseries will be rendered in authentic black and white. Details and a teaser trailer at the AV  Club.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Alps (2011): Read our review. ‘ absurd black comedy about actors who hire out to the bereaved to portray lost loved ones was one of his few misses after he found his auteurial voice; it’s still of interest. On Blu-ray from Kino Lorber with a new commentary track by film historian Amy Simmons. Buy Alps.

Apocalypse Now: Final Cut (1979): Read ‘s review of Apocalypse Now Redux. A redux of the redux, ‘s “final cut” of his slightly surreal Vietnam War nightmare is surely the definitive final word on this masterpiece. You may still be able to catch this in its limited theatrical run; if not, it’s now out in a 6-disc (!) set containing a standard Blu-ray, a 4K Ultra HD disc, two more discs in each format with the theatrical and redux cuts on them, a Blu-ray of recycled extra features, and a Blu-ray with the documentary Hearts of Darkness and all new featurettes. The horror! Buy Apocalypse Now: Final Cut.

Dogtooth (2009): Read the Canonically Weird review! This strange and dsiturbing Greek parable about three adult children who are isolated in a villa and taught lies about the outside world appears in an updated Blu-ray from Kino Lorber, with a new commentary track from actors Christos Stergioglou and , a new interview with director Yorgos Lanthimos, and several extras recycled from previous releases. Buy Dogtooth.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

NEPOTISM CORNER:

“The Diabolical Damon Zex/Checkmate” (Screening at Spectacle Theater Sep. 7, 9, 17 & 20): Back in the early days of the site, we thought underground DVD distribution might be a viable business proposition. So in 2010 we released “The Best of Damon Zex,” a compilation of clips from 1990’s public access provocateur , along with his self-contained short film “Checkmate.” Now Brooklyn’s estimable ultra-underground Spectacle Theater—a venue that regularly screens films so obscure that even we have never heard of them—catches Zex fever, as Damon highlights their “Public Access, Private Desires” series. See greasepainted Goth Damon eat his girlfriend’s used tampon (we’re not kidding!) as the highlight of the surreal atrocities he once inflicted upon those foolish enough to tune in to his groundbreaking (and quickly banned) television show. If you can’t make it to Brooklyn, you can always buy a copy of the DVDDamon Zex at Spectacle Theater.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Next week, 366 goes porno! That’s right, it’s sexytime. Giles Edwards warms you up with a review of the movie doesn’t want you to know he directed—the 1976 skin flick 9 Lives of a Wet Pussy. The, Pete Trbovich will take a hard look at the world’s first (only?) all-puppet hardcore film, Let My Puppets Come (also 1976). Finally, in the afterglow, G. Smalley tells you the sadomasochistic story of Singapore Sling (1990), which may not carry an XXX rating, but which will gross you out far more (unless you’re actually turned on by the idea of humping a mummy). Google tells us you guys want “weird sex,” and weird sex we shall give you! Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.