Category Archives: Miscellanea

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/22/2021

366 Weird Movies may earn commissions from purchases made through product links.

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Broadcast Signal Intrusion (2021): A video technician investigates a sporadic series of eerie pirate broadcasts, leading him down a rabbit hole of conspiracy.  Maybe a bit of a long-shot for “weird,” but it’s from (who directed the best segment of the triptych The Signal), and the Videodrome comparisons will be inevitable. Broadcast Signal Intrusion official site.

NEW RELEASES STREAMING ONLINE:

Lamb (2021): Read our review. A24’s Icelandic folk-(kind of) horror will screen online for one night only, Tuesday, October 26, at 9 PM EDT. There should be some slight bonus content. Note that, if a similar event A24 held for The Green Knight earlier this year is any indication, the film will show up on regular VOD channels soon afterwards at a cheaper price. Buy tickets to Lamb at A24’s website.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Dune (1984): Read our review. ‘s least favorite of his own movies gets a deluxe limited edition release consisting of a 4K UHD and a standard Blu-ray, an additional Blu packed with extra features, two booklets and a fold-out poster, all in steelbook packaging. If you’re asking yourself, “didn’t they just rerelease this in a limited edition August?,” you’ve got a great memory; and you should know there is actually another 4K Ultra release scheduled for December. Buy Dune.

“Yokai Monsters Collection”: A three-Blu box from Arrow containing four movies about the Japanese folkloric monsters known as yokai: the trilogy 100 Monsters (1968), Spook Warfare (1968), and Along with Ghosts (1969), plus ‘s kid-friendly series tribute The Great Yokai War (2005). Buy “Yokai Monsters Collection”.

CANONICALLY WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

This section will no longer be updated regularly. Instead, we direct you to our new “Repertory Cinemas Near You” page. This week, we welcome back Oakland, CA’s New Parkway, who will celebrate Halloween with two screenings of the classic Nosferatu (1922), with a new live score performed by Sleepbomb. We’re also adding a new venue: Vancouver, B.C.’s Cinematheque, who will be featuring Eyes Without a Face [Les Yeux sans Visage] (1965) this upcoming Wednesday and Thursday, and Possession (1981) on Thursday (and wouldn’t that make an incredible double feature?) We will continue to mention exceptional events in this space from time to time.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Be sure to join us tomorrow night at 10:15 ET for our second October Weird Watch Party, Phantasm (1979). It’s on Tubi, so no subscription required, but a free Kast account is. As always, look for the link here, on Facebook, and on Twitter around 15 minutes before showtime.

Next week will be taking a mysterious hiatus to work on a non-366 related project. This could lead to some minor wonkiness on the site and few-to-no social media updates. But don’t worry, has you covered with a review of the made-on-a-dare microbudget horror Dementia: Part II (2018); then, chips in (and chips away at the reader-suggested review queue) with a look at the crazy star-studded detective movie collaboration between and U2’s Bono, The Million Dollar Hotel (2000). Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that we have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/15/2021

366 Weird Movies may earn commissions from purchases made through product links.

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Bergman Island (2021): A filmmaking couple vacation on ‘s home island of Fårö, looking for inspiration. Perhaps a long shot for weird; although it’s described as “dreamlike” and “lightly meta,” one gets the sense that it will be most rewarding to those with an intimate knowledge of both Bergman and director Mia Hansen-Løve. Bergman Island official site.

The Blazing World (2021): A phantasmagorical trip inside a suicidal young woman’s mind as she visits another dimension after the death of her twin. After debuting at Sundance’s “Midnight” section, it got a lot of praise for its visuals, and less for its story. No official site located.

Labyrinth of Cinema (2019): Read our Apocrypha Candidate review! ‘s final film is an epic meta-exploration of Japanese cinema initiated by a time-traveler arriving in a goldfish-bowl spaceship. The U.S. debut is at the Metrograph in NYC this Wednesday (with screenings all week long), to be followed by scattered dates across the country through January. Labyrinth of Cinema U.S. distributor’s page.

IN DEVELOPMENT:

Zapper (202?): My Neighbor Wants Me Dead‘s is coming out with another zero-budget psychedelic feature. This one is a crime comedy Gatsby describes as “almost like Pulp Fiction on acid.” The teaser trailer below contains NSFW language and banana violence.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

The Green Knight (2021): Read our Apocrypha Candidate review. A weirder Arthurian epic than Excalibur, now on DVD, Blu-ray 4K ultra or VOD. Buy The Green Knight.

“He Came from the Swamp: The William Grefé Collection”: A la Severin’s “The Dungeon of Andy Milligan”, here’s another box set of strange-but-crappy films, this time from Arrow and “celebrating” Florida drive-in guru William Grefé. Grefé alternated between pumping out creature-features with giant sharks and jellyfish and drugsploitation pictures. The set contains most of his work—Sting of Death (1966), Death Curse of Tartu (1966), The Hooked Generation (1968), The Psychedelic Priest (1971), The Naked Zoo (1971), Mako: Jaws of Death (1976) and Whiskey Mountain (1977)—and a documentary about the auteur. Buy “He Came from the Swamp The William Grefé Collection”.

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (2014): Read our review. A re-release of the existing DVD/Blu-ray of the sequel to the canonically weird original. Buy Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.

CANONICALLY WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

This section will no longer be updated regularly. Instead, we direct you to our new “Repertory Cinemas Near You” page. This week, we’re happy to announce the addition of a major new venue, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. As it’s name implies, this impressive new edifice (it opened on September 30 of this year) is a museum with interactive exhibits from Hollywood history, but they also naturally host screenings of repertory fare, which will occasionally involve weird movies. This week they have Spirited Away (2001) on October 19 and Howl’s Moving Castle (2004) on the 21st in honor of Studio Ghibli Fest 2021. You can expect more there through November, and look forward to Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) on October 30. We will continue to mention exceptional events in this space from time to time.

FREE ONLINE WEIRD MOVIES:

Millennium Actress (2001): Read the Certified Weird entry!‘s sophomore picture—a mixed-up anime biopic of a fictional Japanese actress—turns up from time to time streaming on free services. Right now, it’s YouTube’s turn. With commercial interruptions. Watch Millennium Actress free on YouTube.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE:

You can still vote for our October 23 Weird Watch Party (Halloween edition), but it seems likely that the winner will be Phantasm (1979) on Tubi.tv. Make plans to join us two Saturdays from now at 10:15 PM ET!

In reviews next week, investigates Walerian Borowczyk‘s final Love Rites (1987), while hopes the new Polish release Never Gonna Snow Again can live up to its promise. Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that we have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

PLANNING OCTOBER 23’S WEIRD WATCH PARTY

We’re ready to take suggestions and votes in the comments for our Weird Watch party, scheduled for Saturday, October 23 at 10:15 PM ET.

Nominations are open for movies on any of the three platforms we’ve used—Netflix, Prime or Tubi/Kast. When making your nomination, simply say “I think we should watch Weird Movie on Netflix” or “I propose Strange Movie on Tubi” or “How about Weird Movie 2: Electric Boogaloo on Prime?”

If you’d like to attend our watch party, then the important thing is to RSVP in the comments, where you can make a screening suggestion, or just say you plan to be there. As always, we’re looking for five likely attendees before officially scheduling.

When the party is set to begin we’ll announce it in three places:

  • On this site (if you’ve signed up for regular email alerts via the sidebar you’ll also get a notice that way)
  • On our Facebook page
  • On Twitter

Make your nominations and/or RSVP in the comments below.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/8/2021

366 Weird Movies may earn commissions from purchases made through product links.

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Lamb (2021): A dark modern folktale about a childless farming couple in Iceland. It won Cannes’ Un Certain Regard and was picked up by A24, marking it as a buzzworthy curio. Lamb page at A24.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Fried Barry (2020): Read our (somewhat split) review! It’s the-man-who-fell-to-earth-in-South-Africa-and-then-got-really-high. Blu-ray or VOD. Buy Fried Barry.

Onibaba (1964): In feudal Japan, a woman and her daughter in-law eke out a living during a war and by scavenging from dead (and sometimes still living) warriors; the arrival of a young man in their deserted village, and the later arrival of a samurai wearing a demon mask, threatens their partnership. An eerie classic Japanese ghost story that’s in our reader-suggested queue, just upgraded by the Criterion Collection to Blu-ray in a new restoration. Buy Onibaba.

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (2006): Read Alice Stoehr’s review. The story of a perfumer who murders, capped by a very strange orgy. This is the first North American Blu-ray release of the film. Buy Perfume: The Story of a Murderer.

Phantasm (1979)/Phantasm II (1988): Read the Canonically Weird entry for Phantasm! The first is a weird horror classic about an undertaker and his shiny balls of death; the sequel rehashes things ten years later. This Blu-ray double feature comes with its own phantastic poster. Buy Phantasm/Phantasm II.

CANONICALLY WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

This section will no longer be updated regularly. Instead, we direct you to our new “Repertory Cinemas Near You” page. This week, we finally added NYC’s IFC Center, who had been open for months but until this week were showing almost entirely new releases. In October they are back into weird movies in a big way with Persona (1966) and Hour of the Wolf [Vargtimmen] (1968), plus the return of weekend midnight shows with Mulholland Drive (2001); they also have Cure (1997) and, inspired by Titane, are screening Crash (1996). We will continue to mention exceptional events in this space from time to time.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: Please join us tomorrow night (Saturday the 8th) at 10:15 PM ET for October’s first Weird Watch Party, Angst (1983) on Tubi.tv. No subscription required, but a free Kast account is. Look for the link here, on Facebook, and on Twitter around 10 PM.

Next week will see Shane Wilson review Anita Ekberg’s turn as a morphine-addicted nun in 1979’s Killer Nun; later on, will check out Lamb (see above). Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that we have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 10/1/2021

366 Weird Movies may earn commissions from purchases made through product links.

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

FILM FESTIVALS – Nightstream (Online, Oct 7-13):

Nightstream came about in 2020 as an online collaboration between smaller film festivals that were canceled due to the pandemic; it proved enough of a success to have another go in 2021. This year, the participating festivals are Boston Underground, Brooklyn Horror, North Bend, and Overlook. All titles stream exclusively online and are geolocked to the U.S.

The streaming titles we’ve covered elsewhere are the nun dramedy Agnes, the Japanese time travel comedy Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes, the experimental documentary Code Name: Nagasaki, Brazil’s sentient auto horror King Car, stop-motion nightmare Mad God, the restrospective Satoshi Kon: The Illusionist, the existential comedy Stanleyville, and the horror-drama We’re All Going to the World’s Fair. Among those we have previously noted but have yet to catch are ‘s visually amazing After Blue (Dirty Paradise) and the title-says-it-all doc Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror. There’s also one promising new-to-us debut: Bloody Oranges, a French feature involving multiple storylines about a dance contest, a crooked politician, and a pervert; programmers use the keyword “surreal.” Also with a revival of the amazingly bad and sleazy direct-to-video horror Boardinghouse (1982) and numerous shorts, podcasts and special panels.

Tickets start at $65 for five films.

Nightstream official homepage.

IN THEATERS (WIDE RELEASE):

Spirited Away (2001): Read the canonically weird entry! ‘s most popular (and arguably best) feature, a good candidate for the title “the ‘Alice in Wonderland’ of Japan,” gets a short-lived wide release courtesy of Fathom Events  for its 20th anniversary. More Miyaki revivals will come in the following weeks in what’s being dubbed “Ghibli Fest.” October 3, 4 and 6 only; look for a participating theater near you at Fathom’s Spirited Away page.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Arrebato (1979): Surprise! This Spanish horror film about a horror film director who receives a mysterious 8MM film that leads to a hallucinogenic nightmare is getting an unexpected re-release in select theaters. A cult item in its homeland, it has never been exhibited in the U.S., and is not on home video in North America (an oversight we expect to change soon). Opens this week in NYC at Anthology Film Archives. More dates can be found at the U.S. distributor’s Arrebato homepage.

Mayday (2021): A world where women are engaged in an endless war, luring men to their death like sirens; a woman not sure if she wants to be a killer. Early reviews are a bit ho-hum. Also available on VOD. Mayday official site.

Titane (2021): A woman who survived a childhood car crash makes her adult living modeling at car shows, and then things get strange. We were intrigued by the idea of s Raw followup, but we were unsure whether it would qualify as weird; after reading reports of its Palme D’or winning Cannes debut, we’re now convinced. Titane U.S. distributor site.

NEW STREAMING SERVICE: KINO CULT:

Kino Lorber has scoured their large catalog (and their sub-labels, including recently-acquired Artsploitation) for their cultiest titles and put them up for free on a new ad-supported streaming service, which advertises itself as “a deep dive into the unapologetically weird.” There are too many titles of interest, many covered here, to mention individually, so we’ll only list the canonically weird titles we noticed: Dogtooth [Kynodontas] (2009), Eden and After (1970), The Forbidden Room (2015), L’Immortelle (1963), and the restored versions of Nosferatu (1922) and Metropolis (1927). Also with a large selection of classic exploitation and most of ‘s catalog. This is truly a bonanza of online weirdness for your perusal. Now, if they’d just add watch party capabilities to the mix… check it out at Kinocult.com.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Devil Story (1986): A French horror with a plot involving mummies, Nazi mutants, and ghost horses, rediscovered and released by Vinegar Syndrome. Early reports suggest it enters into territory. Currently listed as “out of stock” at Amazon (though you can check the link to see if that’s changed), but you can always order these limited editions directly from Vinegar Syndrome. Blu-ray only. Buy Devil Story.

“Melvin Van Peebles: Essential Films”: This Criterion Collection box set is, naturally, highlighted by Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971). Melvin’s experimental debut The Story of a Three Day Pass may also be of interest, but the kicker is son Mario’s comedy biopic Baadasssss! (2003), about the making of Sweetback. On five Blu-rays. Buy “Melvin Van Peebles: Essential Films”.

Never Gonna Snow Again: A mysterious masseur appears in an upscale Polish neighborhood. Comparisons to Teorema naturally arise. DVD or Blu-ray. Buy Never Gonna Snow Again.

Tough Guys Don’t Dance (1987): A drug-addicted writer finds a severed head after a two-week blackout bender and tries to piece together what happened. The directorial debut of writer Norman Mailer is seriously intended (it debuted at Cannes) but odd, campy, and raunchy; an unusual pickup for trash label Vinegar Syndrome. Buy Tough Guys Don’t Dance.

CANONICALLY WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

This section will no longer be updated regularly. Instead, we direct you to our new “Repertory Cinemas Near You” page. We do have to mention that NYC’s the Metrograph is back, baby, showing the new restored print of Possession (1981) all week, and tossing in some oddities like the Chesty Morgan bra-buster Double Agent 73 , She Dies Tomorrow, and a smattering Halloween faves like In The Mouth of Madness through October. Also, Seattle’s Central Cinema is back in the game, with Suspiria (1977) playing next week. And heck, we’ll throw in Louisville, Kentucky’s Speed Art Museum Cinema, with 8 1/2 (1963) playing this weekend. We will continue to mention exceptional events in this space from time to time.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE: There’s still time to vote for our next Weird Watch Party (scheduled for the evening of October 9). If things hold up, we’ll be screening the serial killer flick Angst (1983) on Tubi.tv.

In reviews, Pete Trbovich will roll up the bizarre kiddie show standalone film Pufnstuff (1970); Giles Edwards is planning a trip to Siberia (2019) with and ; and braves the theater for ‘s Palme d’Or winning body-horror, Titane. Onward and weirdward!

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that we have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.