Category Archives: Interviews

DER INTERVIEW: NIKIAS CHRYSSOS ON “DER BUNKER”

366 Weird Movies’s Alex Kittle conducted the following interview with Der Bunker (review) director via email.

Alex Kittle, 366 Weird Movies: I was struck by the retro aesthetic, the mix of patterns and saturated lighting, and attention to detail in the set and costumes in Der Bunker. What made you decide to do a single location film? What were your inspirations for the look of the bunker? Did you face challenges with the limited space?

nikias chryssosNikias Chryssos: My grandparents had a holiday house in Switzerland. It had this big bunker room in the basement with a thick iron door as a shelter for wartime. I imagined it would be funny if someone wants to rent a room and he basically gets locked away. I wanted to build a story about a place like this. Initially, the film was set in a kind of fairytale house in the woods but when we found the entrance to this bunker during our location search, we decided to put the whole story underground. The limited setting gave us a lot of control but also provided us with specific challenges. My production designer Melanie Raab, the cinematographer Matthias Reisser, and I then did a lot of research and the main challenge was to make the setting interesting even though everything takes place in one house. We wanted to give the different rooms different colors and moods but still keep it coherent. We also worked with different lighting set-ups, like more contrast during the night scenes and softer light in the day, even though the light might not change that much underground. As the student, our main protagonist, is working on some big scientific work, it was also interesting to work with patterns and build little connections there, whether it is the wallpaper, the walls, his blanket, the door frames or Klaus’ pajamas. Sometimes, these patterns also give the feeling of a prison cell. Thanks to great production design team, I never had the feeling something I wanted wasn’t possible. Another challenge was to not go mad in such a claustrophobic set during the shoot.

366: Much of the film’s tension centers around Mother’s intense hold on her son, and fear of allowing him to grow up and leave her. What led you to approach the mother character with that angle? What about this theme resonates with you?

NC: I feel there is a big fear in today’s parents that their children might not make it, a fear they become a failure, and they don’t let them go. It may lead to a weird mixture of being overly demanding and over-protective at the same time, and I think that’s a hard situation for a child. Maybe it comes down to the old question of freedom versus security which we face again and again on different Continue reading DER INTERVIEW: NIKIAS CHRYSSOS ON “DER BUNKER”

RAW AUDIO: PEDRO RIVERO “PSYCHONAUTS” INTERVIEW

Raw audio of G. Smalley‘s interview with , co-director of the new animated visionary fable Psychonauts, the Forgotten Children (a feature version of the award-winning short “Birdboy”). Mr. Rivera apologizes for his English, but you can certainly understand him, and he says some intriguing things about how animation changes the audience’s relationship to the characters and milieu, making it the best format to tell certain kinds of stories.

Interview highlights

Mini-review of Psychonauts, the Forgotten Children

Other Fantasia 2106 interviews:

Joel Potrykus of The Alchemist Cookbook

Pat Tremblay of Atmo HorroX

Michael Reich and Mike Pinkney of She’s Allergic to Cats

RAW AUDIO: MICHAEL REICH & MIKE PINKNEY “SHE’S ALLERGIC TO CATS” INTERVIEW

Raw audio of G. Smalley‘s interview with director and actor of the new L.A. weirdo-underground romantic comedy/nightmare flick She’s Allergic to Cats. Since I didn’t introduce them properly, Pinkney has the slightly higher voice and is the one who says “thank you, so honored to hear that” at the beginning; Reich’s first line is “I’ll hold you to that.” Stick around until the end for a technical discussion of canine anal gland expression.

Interview highlights

Mini-review of She’s Allergic to Cats

“Milkshake” by Yuck – music video directed by Michael Reich

Other Fantasia 2106 interviews:

Joel Potrykus of The Alchemist Cookbook

Pat Tremblay of Atmo HorroX

Pedro Rivero of Psychonauts

RAW AUDIO: PAT TREMBLAY “ATMO HORROX” INTERVIEW

Raw audio of G. Smalley‘s interview with director at the 2016 Fantasia Film Festival. Over a beer at the Irish Embassy Pub in Montreal, Tremblay discusses the origins of his latest budget neosurrealist epic Atmo HorroX in a “trippy photoshoot.”

Interview highlights

Mini-review of Atmo HorroX

Trailer for Atmo HorroX

Other Fantasia 2106 interviews:

Joel Potrykus of The Alchemist Cookbook

Michael Reich and Mike Pinkney of She’s Allergic to Cats

Pedro Rivero of Psychonauts

RAW AUDIO: JOEL POTRYKUS “ALCHEMIST COOKBOOK” INTERVIEW

Raw audio of G. Smalley‘s interview with director at the 2016 Fantasia Film Festival. Topics include the Michigan-based low-budget director’s latest, the forest-bound occult horror The Alchemist Cookbook, and how many movies Potrykus would make if given a million-dollar budget. (Not included in this clip: Potrykus confuses Smalley with unidentified blogger “Creepy Greg”).

Interview highlights

Mini-review of The Alchemist Cookbook

Other Fantasia 2106 interviews:

Pat Tremblay of Atmo HorroX

Michael Reich and Mike Pinkney of She’s Allergic to Cats

Pedro Rivero of Psychonauts

TORGO RISING: INTERVIEW WITH DAVID ROY OF “MANOS: THE RISE OF TORGO”

David Roy is a film director who subscribes to the cult of ‘Manos.’ So fervent is his devotion he has created his own prequel to the original film. If you haven’t yet seen Manos: The Hands of Fate, considered to be one of the worst films ever made, this fondly regarded dismal classic is in the public domain[1].

Download ‘Manos’: The Hands of Fate from the Internet Archive

In 1966, insurance and fertilizer salesman Hal Warren had a dream: to make a horror film about a cult in Texas that would make him incredibly rich. Shooting on a camera that could only record thirty seconds at a time and with no sound, instead he delivered a barely coherent, badly dubbed—if admittedly iconic and strangely unsettling—train wreck featuring inexplicably action-free sequences, clapper boards in frame, and a staccato-voiced servant with bulging knees who may or may not be a satyr.

Premiering to a baffled and frankly embarrassed audience —including stars Tom Neyman and his young daughter Jackey—Manos was screened once, then drifted into obscurity until uncovered by the bad-movie-roasting TV show . The episode featuring Manos went on to be one of the most popular episodes of the series and led to a resurgence of interest in this forgotten rough diamond.

The growing popularity of Manos has inspired a successful Kickstarter-funded restoration of the film, a video game, documentaries, a full length puppet stage play (“Manos: The Hands of Felt“), and numerous attempts at a sequel, including Jackie “Debbie” Neyman-Jones’ own Manos Returns, to be released later this year. Roy’s film will be the first prequel to the original Manos.

366 Weird Movies’ Bryan Pike spoke to Roy about his prequel Manos: The Rise of Torgo via a series of international emails.

366: How did you first come across the Manos phenomenon?

Production still from Manos: The Rise of TorgoDavid Roy: My first exposure to Manos was through “Mystery Science Theater 3000” way back in ’93. I used to watch the show all the time, and when I saw the Manos episode, I don’t know, somehow it rang familiar. The movie is the worst ever made yet it’s striking, you never forget it.

366: Before we get onto your film, can you tell me more about the cult of Manos? What other activities does the fanbase indulge in? For example are there regular gatherings for screenings of the film a la The Rocky Horror Picture Show where the audience recites dialogue and performs actions to accompany the onscreen action?

Roy: I haven’t seen anything remotely like Rocky Horror. The most I’ve seen is some cosplay at a comic convention. People love to quote the film, mostly Torgo’s lines “the Master does not approve” and Continue reading TORGO RISING: INTERVIEW WITH DAVID ROY OF “MANOS: THE RISE OF TORGO”

  1. Actually, the issue of who, if anyone, owns the copyright to Manos is still being contested. Hal Warren never put a copyright symbol on the original, film so it technically the film belongs to the public domain. In 2013 his son, Joe Warren, discovered that the screenplay had been copyrighted and believes this means the film itself is also copyrighted. However no precedent for this case exists, so the legal status of the film remains uncertain. []