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WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Only 33 movies left to Certify Weird

Next week Alfred Eaker takes us to the end of ‘s career (and perhaps of our coverage of him) with a review of the Swede’s 1982 swan song, Fanny and Alexander. Then it’s into the reader-suggested review queue as Shane Wilson debates whether we should let the modern vampire classic Let the Right One In in, while G. Smalley looks into the eye-opening mindbender Open Your Eyes. We’ll end our weekly slate of reviews with a second look at ‘s semi-silent 1999 essay in Expressionism, Tuvalu.

Privacy settings make it harder and harder for us to find truly weird search terms each week, but until they dry up completely,  we’ll continue to list the weirdest searches that brought people to the site each week. This week we begin with one that goes in the “we’d actually like to see that” file: “child is found dying and turned into elf in foreign movie”.  Next up is the search for “366weirdmovies hillary clinton” (we aren’t aware of any movies Hillary’s made, weird or otherwise, but if she’s taken up filmmaking in her retirement, we’d be willing to take a look at them). We guess we’ll pick “80s-90s movie eat goo an change” for our official Weirdest Search Term of the Week (is it about people eating goo and change—the weirder option—or about people who eat goo that makes them change?)

Here’s how the ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Let the Right One In (next week!); Open Your Eyes (next week!); Genius Party; The Idiots; “Premium” (depending on availability); Spermula; Killer Condom; I Am Here Now; Sir Henry at Rawlinson Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/18/2018

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

How to Talk to Girls at Parties (2017): adapts a   story about the perils of picking up aliens. Though the pedigree is good, this one sadly flopped at Cannes and with critics; is it really that bad, or just a misunderstood misfit? How to Talk to Girls at Parties official site.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984): Read the Certified Weird entry. This release of the wacky cult classic about scientist/rock star/superhero Banzai is identical to Shout Factory’s 2016 collector’s edition, but now in the collectible steelbook format. The movie’s on Blu-ray, with a disc of special features on a separate DVD. Buy The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension.

The Sacrifice (1986): Read Alfred Eaker’s review. ‘s final film, about an atheist professor who desperately offers his life to God to save his family from World War III, resembles a film (it was even shot by Bergman’s camera guy, Sven Nykvist). Kino re-releases it on Blu-ray in a restored version with an entire disc of extra features. Buy The Sacrifice.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FREE (LEGITIMATE RELEASE) MOVIES ON TUBI.TV:

From Beyond (1986): Read our capsule review. ‘s immediate followup to Re-Animator was another gooey, campy Lovecraftian romp. Listed as “leaving soon” (with no specific date). Watch From Beyond free on Tubi.TV.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Only 35 more movies left to Certify Weird…

Next week, Alfred Eaker begins his summer penance with his first blockbuster review, the the  vehicle Life of the Party. As painful as that experience sounds, it might not be as bad as Pete Trbovich‘s assignment: the disastrous 1999 adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions (don’t shed a tear for him, he volunteered for it). Then G. Smalley will bring you your first look at ‘s upcoming experimental drama Madeline’s Madeline, and then bring you long-awaited coverage of the under-the-radar Japanese cult comedy Survive Style 5+.

It was another weak week in weird search terms used to locate 366 Weird Movies, as Google privacy settings continue to hide over 95% of queries from our prying eyes. As always, we’ll let you know what we did see. Let’s see… “movie where a deformed boy on skateboard is attacked by a dog.” Is that odd? How about the simple question “what is the necrophiliac movie called”? That would probably qualify as a weird on another site, but here it’s probably an appropriate question.  The closest thing to an actual weird search we found was “a cartoon that people lights up when they have sex.” Let’s make it weirder next week, searchers, shall we?

Here’s how the ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Breakfast of Champions (next week!); Survive Style 5+ (next week!); Genius Party; The Idiots; “Premium” (depending on Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/11/2018

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Lu Over the Wall: Little Mermaid variation in which the fish-girl joins a teen rock band. This kids’ movie that carefully describes itself as “joyously hallucinogenic but family-friendly” comes from Masaaki Yuasa—the mind behind the weirder Night Is Short, Walk on Girl (not to mention Mind Game). Lu Over the Wall official site.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Atmo HorroX (2016): Read our festival capsule. This “experimental satire inside a psychedelic horror b-movie and wrapped into a cryptic mystery thriller” is—for better and worse—as weird as they come. With all the dialogue in a nonsensical invented language, it easily earns a “weirdest!” rating, although it’s so incoherent it comes with a “not for everyone” tag, even for weirdophiles. Buy it if you dare on Vimeo.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

NEPOTISM CORNER:

Robert Hubbard (El Rob Hubbard) served as script supervisor on the dark indie thriller Goodland, in limited release in N.Y.C. and L.A. theaters this Friday. El Rob also did some extra duty in front of the camera in the diner scene, so you might catch a glimpse of this elusive character… Look for it on VOD this August, with a physical media debut after that.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

THE (KINDLE VERSION) OF THE 2017 YEARBOOK IS FINALLY HERE!

Late, as usual. As always, the recycled ad copy speaks for itself:

Covering everything weird, from art house surrealism to next-generation cult movies to so-bad-they’re-weird B-movie atrocities, 366 Weird Movies has been meeting all of your weird movie needs since 2009 with a combination of sly humor and serious insight. This is our annual Yearbook covering all the weird movies released and re-released in 2017, from “The Bad Batch” to “We Are the Flesh”, with 35 full-length reviews, extensive capsules and supplemental listings, and exclusive interviews with gore maestro Yoshihiro Nishimura (“Tokyo Gore Police” and the upcoming “Kodoku Meatball Machine”), the director and crew of the genre hit “Lowlife,” and others. If it’s weird, it’s a movie, it’s from 2017, and 366 Weird Movies covered it, you’ll find it here.

The print version of the Yearbook requires additional formatting and proofing and should be available for sale in a couple of weeks.

Buy the 2017 Kindle edition of the 366 Weird Movies Yearbook here (please).

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Only 36 more movies to Certify Weird!

And, there’s only one day left to vote in our annual send Alfred to a Summer Blockbuster poll. If it ended today, Alfred would be complaining about being sent to cover Slender Man, the vehicle Life of the Party, and Jaws/Godzilla mashup The Meg—but there’s plenty of time for that to change.

Speaking of Alfred, he’ll be dealing with his blockbuster anxiety by seeking the comfort of another movie: this time up, it’s Autumn Sonata. Then it’s time to clear out some of that reader-suggested list, as G. Smalley watches the S&M-themed pink movie Blind Beast; Pete Trbovich suffers through the Swedish horror parody Evil Ed; and Giles Edwards revisits Dark City.

Once again, it’s time to review the weirdest search terms that brought users to the site this week. We think “movie where fat guy was tied up and fed paint chips” is probably a real film, although can’t say we recognize it. A bit weirder is the extremely specific “list the 1950,s sci fi band w films santa monica library carries” (read literally, this seems to be a request for the name of a sci-fi band from the 1950s who made multiple movies that are in the Santa Monica library’s collection. Sorry, no idea.) Our weirdest search term of the week, however, was undoubtedly “lailqphlztkuozaup3ezpvhlzt51mth” (for security reasons we actually changed one digit in that string, which didn’t make a difference to the overall nonsense). Not only does that random string not turn up anything on our site—making it technically impossible for someone to visit us from a search link—Google turns up no hits for it at all. A hacker searching for passwords? Maybe. But how did they end up here?

Here’s how the ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Blind Beast (next week!); Evil Ed (next week!); Genius Party; The Idiots; “Premium” (depending on availability); Spermula; Killer Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/4/2017

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Altered Perception (2018): Volunteers for a trial medication that promises to cure false perceptions find themselves instead addicted to a psychedelic drug that causes psychosis. With a title like that, it better have some great hallucination scenes. Altered Perception official site.

The Cleanse (2018): An unemployed man lands at a retreat where he undergoes a “cleanse” therapy, which involves drinking foul brews and vomiting up min-monsters. The L.A. Times‘ Gary Goldstein called it “one short, strange trip…” The Cleanse official site.

Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc (2017): s rock opera about young Joan D’Arc finally arrives in limited release in the U.S. Who doesn’t want to see medieval nuns voguing? Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc U.S. distributor site.

FILM FESTIVALS – Cannes Film Festival (Cannes. France, 5/8-5/19):

Cannes is an odd duck. Not known as a “weird-friendly” festival—movies like ‘s Crash and Antichrist have been famously hooted at by Cannes crowds who were having none of that—it aims to flatter the mainstream arthouse crowd with middle-of-the-road dramas (and, rarely, dramadies, so long as they are not too funny to be taken seriously). Cannes programmers revel in the dry, the conventional, and the pompous; Cannes’ juries’ tastes resemble those of Academy Awards voters, but with an even higher premium placed on boringness. Still, one or two movies worth looking at always seem to find their way onto the card, and 2018 is particularly rich. Many years, a Cannes debut will end up Certified Weird: three films in the past six years, including, most recently, 2012’s Holy Motors. Movies at Cannes may either be screened “in competition” for the big prize, the Palm D’or; screen out-of-competition; or be entered in the “Un Certain Regard” section (a sort of also-ran competition for films that are either from first time directors, or are considered too daring or different to have a shot at the Palme d’Or). Recently, many filmmakers have been debuting their films in the parallel festival called Directors’ Fortnight, which runs contemporaneous to Cannes proper but does not hand out awards for individual films. ( surreal supernatural revenge drama Mandy, which debuted at Sundance, will play there).

Here’s what we would be keeping tabs on if we were in France next week:

  • The House That Jack Built – We question how weird it will be, but ‘s serial killer pic is one of the most buzzed-about titles at Cannes, and does feature a mysterious entity called “the Verge” who dialogues with a murderous Matt Dillon. Out of competition.
  • Lazzaro Felice [Happy as Lazzaro] – Hard to figure out what this Italian movie is about, but the synopsis suggests intriguing characters like a time-traveler and a ruler known as the “Queen of Cigarettes.” In competition.
  • Le Livre du Image [Image Book] – We haven’t been the biggest fans of his late work, but always demands attention; he describes this one as “like a bad dream written on a stormy night.” In competition.
  • The Man Who Killed Don Quixote‘s ill-fated Quixote variation, 20 years in the making and still under a legal cloud, is possibly the most anticipated debut at Cannes. Out of competition.
  • Muere, Monstruo, Muere [Murder Me, Monster] – A beheading leads an investigator to develop a strange conspiracy theory. Un Certain Regard.
  • Under the Silver Lake – A young man goes on a “surreal quest” through Los Angeles to find a mysterious missing girl; from the director of the indie horror it It Follows. In competition.

Cannes Film Festival official site.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

The Cleanse (2018): See description in “Limited Release” above. Like many indies nowadays, this film is also available for VOD purchase the day it hits theaters. Buy The Cleanse on-demand.

Kaleidoscope (2016): Psychological thriller in which a recently-released prisoner finds his domineering mother is interfering with his ability to reintegrate into society. The second feature from Rupert Jones (brother of Kaleidoscope‘s star, veteran character actor Toby Jones); his first was an opera (2013’s The Answer to Everything) cast with homeless people. On DVD, Blu-ray, and VOD. Buy Kaleidoscope.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Only 37 movies left to Certify Weird!

Sumer is a-cumen in, and so it’s once again time to punish Alfred Eaker by sending him to three Hollywood summer blockbusters. We’ll have a poll up tomorrow. Next week will also bring you your first look at Australia’s would-be gay cult film, Fags in the Fast Lane. Then, Shane Wilson goes into the reader-suggested queue for the torture-porn twist Hard Candy, while G. Smalley finally gets around to an official review of the oft-requested  black comedy After Hours. Loudly sing, cuckoo!

It’s time once again for our weekly survey of weird search terms that unaccountably brought users to the site this week. First off, here’s a search we see variations of a lot: “mainstream bestiality scenes.” Guys, give it up; there is nothing mainstream about bestiality, and (Coming Soon notwithstanding) there never will be. Next up is the search for a “fantasy movie where people are transported to a magical land and the bad guys throw their prisoners at a wall of sticky do.” Yuck (if “do” is what we think it is.) For our official Weirdest Search Term of the Week, we select “a movie that thry put a drunk man inbthe car spin it on ice jump in a scream,” a query which itself might have been typed by a drunk man in a car spinning on the ice.

Here’s how the ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Hard Candy (next week!); Genius Party; The Idiots; “Premium” Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 4/27/2018

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs and Blu-rays (and hot off the server VODs), and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

NEW ON HOME VIDEO:

Dead Man (1995): Read the Certified Weird review! Jim Jarmusch‘s moody western about Nobody and William Blake gets the Criterion Collection treatment, with a host of new interviews, features, behind the scenes performances, and deleted scenes for uberfans. On DVD and Blu-ray. Buy Dead Man.

Moon Child (1989): A parapsychological cult believes they may have found the prophesied “moon child” in a 12-year old orphan. From , with a score by Dead Can Dance.  Blu-ray/DVD combo pack from Cult Epics. Review coming soon. Buy Moon Child.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FREE WEIRD MOVIES ON TUBI.TV:

The 50 Worst Movies Ever Made: A glorified YouTube upload posing as a one-hour feature film, but an interesting set of clips, nevertheless. At least three of these selections are Certified Weird, many others are reviewed here, and, as is usually the case with these kinds of lists, not all of them are actually bad—just beyond the curator’s expectations of what a movie “should” be. Watch The 50 Worst Movies Ever Made free on Tubi.TV.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Only 38 more movies to Certify Weird!

Next week, Alfred Eaker continues his series on the great (and sometimes weird) with 1968’s existential war parable Shame. Pete Trbovich and Shane Wilson will address some of the items lingering in that massive reader-suggested queue with reviews of the hypnotic horror Anguish and the sketchy B-movie spoof Amazon Women on the Moon, respectively (both clicks are from 1987, by coincidence). Finally, G. Smalley will complete our coverage of ‘s “Orphic” trilogy with a look at the cinematic poet’s final effort, The Testament of Orpheus (1960).

We’re sure you’re tired of hearing us tell you about how Google’s damnable privacy settings are preventing us from seeing 95% of the search terms people use to find this site, thereby impeding our review of the weirdest search terms of the week. Everybody’s a fan of privacy in principle, but no one thinks of the unintended impacts to weird search term research. At any rate, we had so few strange candidates to report this week that we’re reduced to reporting on a repeat of an exceptionally odd one: “peeping 40 animals porn movie.com” (that’s right, this searcher somehow failed to find an acceptable peeping 40 animals porn movie site last week, so he continued his search this week). Other than that, what have we got? Well, there’s someone’s quest to find “poleshsex” (?) Good luck. Fortunately, we did see one fresh candidate that merited the title of Weirdest Search Term of the Week: “the man came down from the mountain and saw a man with a sword this mans name was terry he had a giant sqord he called the king.” Nice story, bro. Remember, turn those privacy filters off when searching for weird movies!

Here’s how the aforementioned ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Anguish (1987) (next week!); Amazon Women on the Moon (next week!); Genius Party; The Idiots; “Premium” (depending on availability); Spermula; Killer Condom; I Am Here Now; Sir Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE