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WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Those of you who’ve been waiting for the 2016 edition of the 366 Weird Movies Yearbook will be happy to know that we’re in the final stags of proofing. Look for an announcement as soon as the end of this upcoming week. As far as this week’s new online content goes: Alfred Eaker will give us part 2 of his 1978 exploitation movie survey (highlighted by ‘s “vampire” movie Martin) and Alex Kittle brings you your first look at the psychological drama/thriller Buster’s Mal Heart, while G. Smalley checks in with a Japanese double feature of the 1985 “noodle Western” Tampopo and a second look at the berserk prison-break anime Dead Leaves (2004).

Now it’s time for our survey of weird search terms that brought visitors to the site, a feature we like to call “Weirdest Search Terms of the Week.” First up we have to mention “what is the name of an old movie where a man wasnt able to make a woman pregnant and he was told to eat balls which would make him make his wife pregnant,” a search term weird indeed, but one that we will disqualify from consideration as weirdest of the week simply because we believe it probably refers to a real movie. Speaking of real movies, we have to give it to the guy looking for “a fat man try to sex with a sexy girl in a zombie movie”: sometimes simple cinematic pleasures are the best. Slightly stranger than these is the search for an “all english hot adult father in low movie list.” (Gotta like the idea of specifying “low” movies; don’t want the search to accidentally come up with waste-of-time highbrow hot adult father movies). There’s not that much strangeness out there in Googleland this week, so we’re going to go a different direction and select “friends boring strangers” as our Weirdest Search Term of the Week. While we can’t think of any logical reason to search for that particular phrase, perhaps the weirdest thing about it is it seems to have nothing to do with sex.

Here’s how our ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Tampopo (next week!); Beauty and the Beast [Panna a Netvor] (1978); 1 Day; The Doom Generation; Black Devil Doll; Vermilion Souls Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/26/2017

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs, and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

IN DEVELOPMENT (announced):

Once Upon a Time in Jerusalem (201?): You may have seen the gory, blasphemous Italian short “Fist of Jesus,” which features an ass-kicking savior carving up zombies with a fish skeleton. German distributor Films Boutique just acquired rights to Jerusalem, the planned feature-length version. We’ll be sure to keep an eye out for it. Once Upon a Time in Jerusalem article at Variety.

Road of the Dead (201?): ‘s dead are scheduled to return from the grave, although George will only be serving as producer, handing the directing reins over to long-time second unit director Matt Birman. Bizarrely enough, the scenario involves zombie race car drivers, a plot twist that may be strange enough to draw our attention back to the moribund series. More at “Den of Geek”.

NEW ON DVD:

Wolf Guy (1975): Sonny Chiba stars as a kung fu/detective/werewolf in this first-time-outside-Japan release. Arrow Films touts their latest deep-cut discovery as “an unforgettable trip to the heights of Japanese cinematic weirdness.” Buy Wolf Guy [DVD/Blu-ray combo].

NEW ON BLU-RAY:

Wolf Guy (1975): See description above. Only available in combo-pack format. Buy Wolf Guy [DVD/Blu-ray combo].

MISCELLANEOUS (Midnight Movie screening funding):

“Midnight Movies at the Uptown theater”: Here’s a long shot for your dollar, but it’s a good cause. Nathan Reynolds is seeking to bring midnight movies to the Richland, WA area (that’s a few miles west of Walla Walla). As I understand it, he’s already scheduled A Clockwork Orange and Delicatessen for early June, and is looking to defray expenses and bring future films to the area. If you’re out in that area, or just looking to donate a few bucks to a worthy weird movie cause, it would be appreciated. Midnight Movies at the Uptown on You Care.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Next week Alfred Eaker starts on part 1 of his survey of exploitation films (he’s up to 1978, the year of Boys from Brazil and The Fury). In other entries in an eclectic week, Terri McSorley gives us the lowdown on the new edition of Multiple Maniacs, while Shane Wilson provides a capsule on Season 11 of . And G. Smalley brings us a second look at ‘s “superhero burlesque,” Batman Returns.

(Speaking of G., he’ll also be working quietly in the background putting the finishing touches on the print version of the 2016 Yearbook—the Kindle version is already out, don’t you know?)

We’re noticing that weird search terms now showing up in our server logs—in fact, almost all of our search terms—are porn/fetish related. A sign of the times, we suppose, although why 2017 should be so much more perverted than 2016, we can’t say. What we can say is that “japanese sex 🎥 in hindi,” was among the weirder search terms we saw (though only because the searcher managed to include a camera icon in their query, which is as rare as it is pointless). Besides that, we also caught “teen milking himself” (himself?), “mom affair boos porn moves.com” (boo!), and “cave man turist kidnnap sex videos.” (See what we mean about the pr0n?) We’ll cap off this sexy week with a pair of vagina-themed items: “mad vagina 3gp” and our official winner of the unofficial Weirdest Search Term of the Week contest, “black guy safes vagina hair movie.” Doesn’t anyone go on Google anymore when they’re not stoned and horny?

Here’s how our ridiculously-long and ever-growing reader-suggested review queue stands: Beauty and the Beast [Panna a Netvor] (1978); 1 Day; The Doom Generation; Black Devil Doll; Vermilion Souls Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/19/2017

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs, and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

ANNOUNCEMENT:

“366 Weird Movies 2016Yearbok” (Kindle edition): In case you missed the post below here’s our official release announcement for the Kindle version of the 366 Weird Movies Yearbook. Print edition to follow within a couple of weeks.

DVR ALERT (Showtime, May 21, 9:00 PM):

“Twin Peaks” Season 3: You may have heard of this one. More info  at Welcome to Twin Peaks.

IN THEATERS (LIMITED RELEASE):

Devil’s Domain (2017): A bullied bulimic girl makes a pact with Satan to get revenge on her tormentors. Sounds by-the-numbers, but we mention it based on Noel Murray’s observation that “intentionally or not, the stream-of-consciousness lurching from scene to scene does give ‘Devil’s Domain’ a dreamlike quality.Devil’s Domain official site.

Icaros: A Vision (2016): In the wake of Embrace of the Serpent comes this trippy pseudo-autobiographical film about first worlders traveling to the Amazon to partake in ayahuasca rituals. The co-director died of breast cancer soon after the movie was completed. Icaros: A Vision official site.

Paint it Black (2017): After her boyfriend commits suicide, a grieving woman comes into conflict with the mother who blames her for her son’s death. This highly-praised psychological thriller, reportedly with surreal/experimental bits, is the directing debut of Amber (daughter of ) Tamblyn. Paint It Black official site.

VIDEO-ON-DEMAND EXCLUSIVE RELEASES:

“The Natural World”: A new web-series with an intriguing description: “Derek sits and is shown visions of the natural world as his life unfolds before him. A strange being begins speaking to him. His Family begins to act strangely.” The first episode ( actually more of 3-minute teaser) is out and is free to watch. The first episode (actually more of 3-minute teaser) is out and is free to watch.

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FILM FESTIVALS – Cannes Film Festival (and Director’s Fortnight) (Cannes, France, May 17-28):

Cannes is an odd duck. Not known as a “weird-friendly” festival—movies like ‘s Crash and Antichrist have been famously hooted at by Cannes crowds who were having none of that—it aims to flatter the mainstream arthouse crowd with middle-of-the-road dramas (and, rarely, dramadies, so long as they are not too funny to be taken seriously). Cannes programmers revel in the dry, the conventional, and the pompous; Cannes’ juries’ tastes resemble those of Academy Awards voters, but with an even higher premium placed on boringness. Still, one or two movies worth looking at always seem to find their way onto the card. In many years a Cannes debut will end up Certified Weird: three films in the past five years, including, most recently, 2012’s Holy Motors. Movies at Cannes may either be screened “in competition” for the big prize, the Palm D’or; screen out-of-competition; or be entered in the “Un Certain Regard” section (a sort of also-ran competition for films that are either from first time directors, or are considered too daring or different to have a shot at the Palme d’Or). Recently, several major filmmakers have been debuting their films in the parallel festival called Directors’ Fortnight, which runs contemporaneous to Cannes proper but does not hand out awards for individual films.

There are a trio of Asian films here from directors who often interest us‘s monster fable Okja, ‘s Before We Vanish, and ‘s samurai epic Blade of the Immortal—but sadly, none of them look particularly weird. Here’s what we would be checking out if we were there:

  • How to Talk to Girls at Parties – adapts a   story about the perils of picking up an alien; the pedigree suggests this could be good and weird (but maybe not). Screening out of competition on 5/21.
  • Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc ‘s rock opera about young Joan D’Arc should ruffle the usual feathers. Playing at Director’s Fortnight, 5/21.
  • The Killing of a Sacred Deer – this is the big weird ticket: ‘ followup to The Lobster (again starring ). Screening in competition. 5/22.
  • “Twin Peaks” – Ironically, a TV series is getting more buzz than any feature film at the festival, as  debuts the rebirth of his (in)famous series here a few days before it goes live. Special screening of the first two episodes on 5/25.

Cannes Film Festival official site (English).

IN DEVELOPMENT (funding):

We R Animals (20??): A black comedy about an underworld of sleazy puppets making exploitative cute animal videos. We first mentioned this one during its original crowdfunding campaign in 2010. Sounds like the script was optioned to someone who decided not to make it, then the creator got the rights back and decided to launch another Kickstarter campaign. They’re at $19,000 of a requested $255,000, with 26 days to go. We R Animals Kickstarter page.

IN DEVELOPMENT (completed):

Mother! (2017): ‘s latest psychological thriller stars Jennifer Lawrence (and who doesn’t want to see J-Law do a Black Swan thing?) They’re keeping a lid on the plot, but released a poster that’s getting some buzz. No official site but check out the Aronofsky Tumblr for the poster and a few rumors.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

THE 2016 YEARBOOK IS HERE! (KINDLE ONLY, FOR NOW…)

Late, as usual. As always, the recycled ad copy speaks for itself:

Covering everything weird, from art house surrealism to next-generation cult movies to so-bad-they’re-weird B-movie atrocities, 366 Weird Movies has been meeting all of your weird movie needs since 2009 with a combination of sly humor and serious insight. This is our annual Yearbook covering all the weird movies released and re-released in 2016, from “April and the Extraordinary World” to “World of Tomorrow”, with over 50 full-length reviews, extensive supplemental listings, and exclusive interviews with Joel Potrykus (“The Alchemist Cookbook”), Pablo Rivera (“Psychonauts: The Forgotten Children”), and others. If it’s weird, and it’s a movie, and it’s from 2016, and 366 Weird Movies covered it, you’ll find it here.

This year, the transcriptions of the 2016 Fantasia interviews (available on our YouTube channel and on these pages) are included as exclusive bonus content (in all editions). The Kindle edition of the Yearbook has fewer pictures, but they are in color (for those with color-capable readers, obviously).

The print version of the Yearbook requires additional formatting and proofing and should be for sale in a couple of weeks.

366 Weird Movie 2016 Yearbook Kindle

Buy the 2016 Kindle edition of the 366 Weird Movies Yearbook here (please).

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Next week, after Alfred Eaker finishes up his survey of 1977’s exploitation movie scene with a look at ‘s  breakthrough body horror Rabid (and many others), Giles Edwards will fulfill all your Phantasm desires with a look at both the series’ putative finale—Phantasm: Ravager—and the recently-released  box set “The Phantasm Collection: Special Edition.” You can also catch Shane Wilson update his old review for The Tingler. While all this is going on, G. Smalley will not be simply sunbathing and drinking imperial stout: he’ll be hard at work on putting the final touches on the long-overdue 366 Weird Movies 2016 Yearbook—so hopefully, we’ll soon have some news to report on that project, as well.

It’s another slim week for weird search terms used to locate the site. Thank goodness for semi-literate perverts, otherwise we would have nothing to feature in our contest for Weirdest Search Term of the Week. Probably the least salacious search we saw this week was the one for “horror. sex. aliens. port. movies.” (Nice use of periods). Going with obvious misspellings always seems like cheating on the list, but nonetheless we couldn’t pass up either “english aunty duck on boy servant” or “hat butful milf full movie.” For our official Weirdest Search Term of the Week, we’ll pick “sex orgy in valentains day of vaginas full length movie s.com.” Is “Valentine’s Day of Vaginas” an actual holiday somewhere?

Here’s how our ridiculously-long and ever-growing reader-suggested review queue stands: Beauty and the Beast [Panna a Netvor] (1978); 1 Day; The Doom Generation; Black Devil Doll; Vermilion Souls Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/12/2017

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs, and on more distant horizons…

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

FILM FESTIVALS – Chicago Film Critics Film Festival (Chicago, IL, Date):

CFCFF is a minor festival with no significant debuts and a few titles of marginal/questionable weird interest (David Lowery’s A Ghost Story) spotted at other venues. Still, there are two screenings here we’d like to highlight:

Chicago Film Critics Festival home page.

NEW ON DVD:

Brain Damage (1988): Read James Phillips’ review. Arrow takes a typically lavish approach to releasing this bad taste drug abuse horror, with new commentary from director and multiple extra features. Buy Brain Damage [DVD/Blu-ray combo pack].

“Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology”: The latest compilation from Flicker Alley focuses on early women filmmakers (1902-1943). To be honest, we’ve never heard of any of them except for , represented by her Certified Weird classic Meshes of the Afternoon. if you don’t own Meshes yet and have an interest in this subject, this release is for you. Buy “Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology” [DVD/Blu-ray combo].

“Kiju Yoshida: Love + Anarchism”: Three obscure, experimental, and political Japanese New Wave features from Yoshida: Eros + Massacre (1969), about an anarchist philosopher; Heroic Purgatory (1970) (reputedly the weirdest), in which an engineer recalls his revolutionary youth; and Coup d’Etat (1973), an unconventional biopic of 1930s nationalist Ikki Kita. From “Arrow Academy,” the new arthouse-centered sub-label from Arrow Video. Buy “Kiju Yoshida: Love + Anarchism” [DVD/Blu-ray combo]

Tall Men (2016): A man is haunted by faceless phantoms after he buys a car with a mysterious black credit card. The ad copy describes it as “Holbrookian,” which stands to reason, since it was directed by Jonathan Holbrook. Buy Tall Men.

NEW ON BLU-RAY:

Brain Damage (1988): See description in DVD above. Buy Brain Damage [DVD/Blu-ray combo pack].

“Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology”: See description in DVD above. Buy “Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology” [DVD/Blu-ray combo].

“Kiju Yoshida: Love + Anarchism”: See description in DVD above. The set contains three Blu-rays and four DVDs. Buy “Kiju Yoshida: Love + Anarchism” [DVD/Blu-ray combo]

Serial Mom (1994): Later effort starring a game Kathleen Turner as the title character. First time on Blu-ray, with all the extras from the 2008 “Collector’s Edition” DVD plus a new three-way interview with Waters, Turner, and co-star . Buy Serial Mom [Blu-ray].

Tall Men (2016): See description in DVD above. Buy Tall Men [Blu-ray].

CROWDFUNDING: BOOKS:

“Lost Girls: The Cinema of Jean Rollin”: A collection of essays on idiosyncratic artsploitation auteur, best known for his slow and mildly surreal lesbian vampire cycle, all written by women. The project has already met its $12,000 goal and is now into a stretch goal of $16,000—if they reach it they promise to add 40 pages of full color images. Perks include a Rollin-themed board game. Six days left and you can put them over the top. “Lost Girls: the Cinema of Jean Rollin” at Indiegogo.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

Next week, we’ll start off with Alfred Eaker (now on Mondays!) and his continuing survey of the 1970s exploitation landscape with a first look at 1977: the year that brought us Star Wars, yes, but also the aquatic zombie shocker Shock Waves and the self-explanatory Satan’s Cheerleaders. Speaking of shlock, er, shock, Pete Trbovich digs into the reader-suggested queue and drags out a little “Penthouse”-backed epic called Caligula. And G. Smalley will knock a couple more out of the queue with reviews of ‘s 1980 psychological romance Bad Timing and 1955’s silent horror experiment Dementia [Daughter of Horror]. And no, we haven’t forgotten about the 2016 Yearbook—editing continues in our spare time…

It was an awful week for weird search terms, making our survey of the most bizarre queries that brought people to the site—that beloved feature we call “Weirdest Search Terms of the Week”—a bit of a sad exercise. Where are the web weirdos? We know you’re out there. Things were so bad we were forced to consider “‘her lower half’ horror movie” as one of the weirder search terms we saw. Maybe that was the same searcher who was looking for another one of our contestants, “3gp vagina warts.” We’ll throw up our hands and pick the simple “teen vomit” as our official Weirdest Search Term of the Week. Things have to get weirder next week, they just have to…

Here’s how our ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Caligula (next week!); Bad Timing (AKA Bad Timing: A Sensual Obsession) (next week!); Daughter of Horror [AKA Dementia] (next week!); Beauty and the Beast [Panna a Netvor] (1978); 1 Day; The Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

WEIRD HORIZON FOR THE WEEK OF 5/5/2017

Our weekly look at what’s weird in theaters, on hot-off-the-presses DVDs, and on more distant horizons…

Trailers of new release movies are generally available at the official site links.

The summer doldrums are officially here, with no wierd theatrical or home video releases to speak of. Things will pick up a little next week. In the meantime, you’ll have to keep an eye out for screenings near you, and enjoy the new trailer for the restored version of ‘s minimalist sic-fi masterpiece Stalker .

CERTIFIED WEIRD (AND OTHER) REPERTORY SCREENINGS:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). We won’t list all the screenings of this audience-participation classic separately. You can use this page to find a screening near you.

What are you looking forward to? If you have any weird movie leads that I have overlooked, feel free to leave them in the COMMENTS section.

WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE

A minor note for long-time readers: for internal reasons, starting next week Alfred Eaker’s Fringe Cinema will be appearing on Mondays instead of Thursdays. Therefore, the week will kick off with the second part of his survey of 1976’s horror and exploitation scene (the first part is here), with a focus on Matt Cimber’s oddball artsploitation effort The Witch Who Came from the Sea. Last week, we leaned heavily on the animation front, and this week we expand on that trend with three cartoon reviews: Giles Edwards takes on the existential 80s kiddie flick Grendel Grendel Grendel, while G. Smalley plans to cover both the new release My Entire High School Sinking into the Sea and the under-the-radar psychedelic 1970s cult cartoon Hugo the Hippo. It’s quite an animated week here at 366 Weird Movies (yeah, we’re drawn to terrible obvious puns).

It seems the summer traffic lull is upon us early, meaning fewer strange search terms for us to highlight in our weekly survey of the Weirdest Search Terms of the Week. What about “babe,bimbo tube- free porn videos”—you’re looking for tube-free porn, dude? (Yeah, we’re stretching here, but there really aren’t enough decent candidates to fill out a list this week). Or maybe “hard spelt movie list” (we assume they’re looking for hard-to-spell movies, which seem like the last type of movies bad spellers should be looking for). Fortunately, we can take the always-available low road for our official Weirdest Search Term of the Week and go with “fat porn sax khartoum american move animal.” Good thing the searcher threw the capital of Sudan into that random mess of nouns, or it would have been just disgusting.

Here’s how our ridiculously-long reader-suggested review queue stands: Grendel Grendel Grendel (next week!); Hugo the Hippo (next week!); Daughter of Horror [AKA Dementia]; Beauty and the Beast Continue reading WHAT’S IN THE PIPELINE